The history behind the Gloucester docks area

The history behind the Gloucester docks area
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Gloucester Docks is one of the key areas within the city and it has played an important role in the history and the present regeneration of the area. Gloucester is again becoming popular location for businesses and visitors alike with a vast regeneration project occurring that has recently seen a new bus station being completed. There are also many new housing developments that are located both within the city centre and also in areas slightly further afield. If you are looking for Houses for sale Gloucester area, then it is worth contacting www.tgres.co.uk/for-sale/houses/gloucester to see how they can help you.

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The Docks area is now a thriving shopping and restaurant/pub centre with the new Gloucester Quays outlet centre bringing shoppers both from local areas and from areas further away. You can often see coach parties arriving to spend a few hours wandering around the centre before perhaps visiting one of the many choices of places to eat around the area.  The docks would have, in the past, been a hive of activity both in terms of trading and the warehouse operations that would have taken place.

The main basin was constructed to act as a terminal for incoming and outgoing vessels and was officially opened in April 1827. Just before it opened the company responsible for the area were concerned that the basin would not be big enough to accommodate the amount of vessels that they were predicting would visit the area for trading and other purposes. To combat this concern, they created an additional barge arm which meant that they could keep the basin area free for any sea-going vessels.

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Gloucester quickly became an important and very popular trading port. Before the basin was constructed the barges and other vessels would have travelled all the way to Bristol in order to offload their cargo for then transporting via land and selling. This increased the sail time and also Bristol had higher port charges than Gloucester. Due to its inland location, Gloucester became the perfect port for transporting goods ready to be sold in the towns and villages of the inland areas. Some of the earliest imports that came into Gloucester included corn from Ireland, wine from Portugal and France and Timber from North America.

During 1840 just, a few short years after the main basin was constructed the canal company realised the need for more space. The basin was often so busy that any vessels wanting to leave after offloading their goods often had to wait for a long time in order to safely leave the basin area. As a result of this they arrange for the Victoria Dock to be created. This was a small area to the east of the main basin with a narrow stripe joining the two. This new area was opened in 1849 and removed some of the pressure on the main basin.

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